PARENTHOOD

MY RESPONSIBILITY

AS A PARENT

MY RIGHTS

AS A PARENT

Search or Tap for Answers Here:

I think I’m pregnant; is there a way to privately find out?


Yes. A Title X funded clinic, like Planned Parenthood, can provided you with a pregnancy test at no cost. The results are confidential and cannot be disclosed to anyone else without your consent, even if you are a minor.




Is access to birth control a right?


Yes. For young women, birth control is a right that you have access to and is free of charge for you. This includes all types of birth control from pills to IUDs to emergency contraception (often called “plan B”). As a young man, there is no legal requirement for insurance companies to cover condoms or vasectomies. This procedure would need to be an approved service under your insurance and you will need to purchase condoms.




As a minor, can I get an abortion without my parent’s permission?


No. Ohio’s law requires parental consent in order for a minor to get an abortion. If you’re unable to get your parent or guardian’s consent, you can go to court and ask for something called a judicial bypass. You will have a hearing within 5 days and the court will assign you an attorney 24 hours before the hearing. There are women’s health centers around the state that can help with this process.




I want to have my child but can’t take care of them; is adoption an option?


Yes. In Ohio, you can voluntarily place your child in the custody of your county child welfare agency, who will find an adoptive family for your baby, or you can work with an adoption agency to find an adoptive family. When you work with an adoption agency, the possibility to be involved, meet the adoptive parents and remain in contact with your baby exist. During a county agency adoption, the entire process is confidential. One final note, open adoption agreements in Ohio are not legally enforceable. These agreements rely on the compliance of both parties.




I think I may be a father, but I’m not in contact with the mother anymore. How can I protect my rights as a parent?


You should register with the Ohio Putative Father Registry. You can register either before your child is born or within 15 days of their birth. You will want to try and have as much information as possible about the mother. Registering is free and you will need to register each time you think that you may have fathered a child, even if it is with the same person. Also, it is always your responsibility to keep your address updated in the registry.




I’m not sure that I’m the father of a child. What are my options?


You will need to establish paternity. Your county child support enforcement agency CSEA can assist in establishing paternity by providing a DNA test. The cost of the test is typically covered by the CSEA.




I had a baby with my ex; do I have any rights to the baby?


Yes, you do have the right to be a parent to your child. Because parenting time is local county courts matter, you will need to go to your local courts to set up what is called a “parenting time schedule” for you and your child’s parent. This parenting time schedule will also address other rights, such as access to school and medical records, tax information and many other details regarding shared parenthood.




I’m under 18 and I have a child; who is responsible for decisions made about my child?


Although you are a minor, you are responsible for all decisions regarding your child. You have the right to make medical decisions, choose which daycare provider to use, decide what school your child will go to and ensure the safety and well-being of your child.




I have a child, can I be denied public assistance?


Yes, you can. Because public assistance programs are need-based, meaning that you must meet certain income eligibility requirements, you can be denied if you do not meet the income requirements. It is important you provide all requested documentation to your county department of job and family services after the birth of your child so that your eligibility can be properly determined.




Now that I’m a parent, do I have to quit school?


No. You or your parent/guardian will want to contact the school as soon as possible to make a plan for when you give birth and when you return to school. If you would like to transition to an alternative education setting, this can also be incorporated into your plan. Your right to an education does not leave you.





Search or Tap for Answers Here:

I think I’m pregnant; is there a way to privately find out?


Yes. A Title X funded clinic, like Planned Parenthood, can provided you with a pregnancy test at no cost. The results are confidential and cannot be disclosed to anyone else without your consent, even if you are a minor.




Is access to birth control a right?


Yes. For young women, birth control is a right that you have access to and is free of charge for you. This includes all types of birth control from pills to IUDs to emergency contraception (often called “plan B”). As a young man, there is no legal requirement for insurance companies to cover condoms or vasectomies. This procedure would need to be an approved service under your insurance and you will need to purchase condoms.




As a minor, can I get an abortion without my parent’s permission?


No. Ohio’s law requires parental consent in order for a minor to get an abortion. If you’re unable to get your parent or guardian’s consent, you can go to court and ask for something called a judicial bypass. You will have a hearing within 5 days and the court will assign you an attorney 24 hours before the hearing. There are women’s health centers around the state that can help with this process.




I want to have my child but can’t take care of them; is adoption an option?


Yes. In Ohio, you can voluntarily place your child in the custody of your county child welfare agency, who will find an adoptive family for your baby, or you can work with an adoption agency to find an adoptive family. When you work with an adoption agency, the possibility to be involved, meet the adoptive parents and remain in contact with your baby exist. During a county agency adoption, the entire process is confidential. One final note, open adoption agreements in Ohio are not legally enforceable. These agreements rely on the compliance of both parties.




I think I may be a father, but I’m not in contact with the mother anymore. How can I protect my rights as a parent?


You should register with the Ohio Putative Father Registry. You can register either before your child is born or within 15 days of their birth. You will want to try and have as much information as possible about the mother. Registering is free and you will need to register each time you think that you may have fathered a child, even if it is with the same person. Also, it is always your responsibility to keep your address updated in the registry.




I’m not sure that I’m the father of a child. What are my options?


You will need to establish paternity. Your county child support enforcement agency CSEA can assist in establishing paternity by providing a DNA test. The cost of the test is typically covered by the CSEA.




I had a baby with my ex; do I have any rights to the baby?


Yes, you do have the right to be a parent to your child. Because parenting time is local county courts matter, you will need to go to your local courts to set up what is called a “parenting time schedule” for you and your child’s parent. This parenting time schedule will also address other rights, such as access to school and medical records, tax information and many other details regarding shared parenthood.




I’m under 18 and I have a child; who is responsible for decisions made about my child?


Although you are a minor, you are responsible for all decisions regarding your child. You have the right to make medical decisions, choose which daycare provider to use, decide what school your child will go to and ensure the safety and well-being of your child.




I have a child, can I be denied public assistance?


Yes, you can. Because public assistance programs are need-based, meaning that you must meet certain income eligibility requirements, you can be denied if you do not meet the income requirements. It is important you provide all requested documentation to your county department of job and family services after the birth of your child so that your eligibility can be properly determined.




Now that I’m a parent, do I have to quit school?


No. You or your parent/guardian will want to contact the school as soon as possible to make a plan for when you give birth and when you return to school. If you would like to transition to an alternative education setting, this can also be incorporated into your plan. Your right to an education does not leave you.





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Content in this online FAQ does not constitute legal advice.

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